Puppetry

Puppetry

The origin of puppet theater is more than 3,000 years old. Some historians even claim that puppet theater is so old that it predates live actors. It was traditionally a silent show, but can also include music, narration, or character voices. Over the centuries, this type of show has produced a rich variety of presentation formats and techniques, some of which even incorporate the progressive use of technology and have helped create cinematographic techniques such as “stop motion”.

In Mexico, puppet theater reached its peak in the late-19th century, in the middle of the “Porfiriato” era. Its themes were generated from popular legends of the colonial era, social, religious and historical events of the society of that time, as well as by the appearance of inventions such as electric power and the cinematograph. Later, during the Mexican Revolution, puppet theater became the vehicle for communicating the reality of Mexico during  that time of turbulence. Each presentation not only provided recreation and fun, but served as a medium for the expression of feelings, reproaches and beliefs of the people of Mexico.

To develop and implement this program, LPP will work closely with brother and sister Alberto and Karina Orozco, puppeteers and owners of the puppet company “La Bruja” in the city of Huamantla, Tlaxcala. This location is the birthplace of “Rosete Aranda”, the most important international festival of puppetry in Mexico, which has an annual attendance of more than 75,000 people.

Through the puppet project, LPP and “La Bruja” will present shows and conduct workshops to teach puppet-making in LPP-network libraries. The themes of the presentations will be connected to those of the libraries’ book collections. Both librarians and children will learn the basic techniques to create their own stories and puppet shows.